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Causes & Symptoms, Living with KP

If I have it, will my child develop Keratosis Pilaris?

While keratosis pilaris is thought to be a genetic skin disorder, not all children will inherit this skin condition from their parents.

However, your child is more likely to develop keratosis pilaris if they have any of the following:

  • Close blood relatives who have keratosis pilaris
  • Asthma
  • Dry skin
  • Eczema
  • Hay fever

If I Have Keratosis Pilaris, Will my Kids Have KP too? | KPKids.net

If the bumps on your child’s skin bother them (or you), applying one of the following treatments can help reduce the itchiness and visibly reduce the appearance of the redness or white bumps.

  • Ammonium lactate cream or lotion (12%): Apply it as directed by your dermatologist. The most common brand is AmLactin.
  • A moisturizer: A cream or ointment works best. Apply it after bathing and gently massage it into the skin with keratosis pilaris 2 – 3 times a day.

 

RELATED: 5 Things NOT to do for Kids with Keratosis Pilaris

 

AmLactin 12 % Moisturizing Lotion – 1134 g / 40 oz (Misc.)


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AmLactin Alpha-Hydroxy Therapy Ultra Hydrating Body Cream, White, Fragrance-Free, 4.9 Ounce (Health and Beauty)


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Source: American Academy of Dermatology

 

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DISCLAIMER: Content on this site is for reference purposes only and is not a substitute for advice from a licensed health-care professional. Always read labels and directions before using any product. Consult your doctor or dermatologist for specific advice about keratosis pilaris, eczema, rosacea, sensitive skin, chicken skin, dry bumpy skin or acne in teens, tweens, kids, children, toddlers, babies and infants. DISCLOSURE: This post contains affiliate or referral links to products we use, love and recommend. KPKids is a member of the Amazon Associates program.

 

     

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