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Causes & Symptoms, FAQ & Tips

What is Keratosis Pilaris (also known as “KP”)?

What is this dermatological condition called Keratosis Pilaris?

Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition diagnosed in approximately 40% of the population.  So if you or your child have KP, you are certainly not alone!

It is characterized by tiny bumps on the skin, usually found on the outer areas of the upper arms, thighs, and cheeks (often referred to as “chicken skin”).

The bumps give a sandpaper-like texture to the skin in these areas.

It commonly presents itself as flesh-colored to slightly red, rough little bumps.

It may occasionally become itchy, but can be managed with proper treatment.

 

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DISCLAIMER: Content on this site is for reference purposes only and is not a substitute for advice from a licensed health-care professional. Always read labels and directions before using any product. Consult your doctor or dermatologist for specific advice about keratosis pilaris, eczema, rosacea, sensitive skin, chicken skin, dry bumpy skin or acne in teens, tweens, kids, children, toddlers, babies and infants. DISCLOSURE: This post contains affiliate or referral links to products we use, love and recommend. KPKids is a member of the Amazon Associates program.

 

     

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2 Comments

  1. […] What is Keratosis Pilaris (also known as “KP”)? […]

  2. […] by a doctor or dermatologist. Your doctor will be able to determine if your symptoms are a sign of keratosis pilaris, eczema or an allergic reaction. Don’t hesitate to ask questions and find a treatment plan […]

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